The Philemon Foundation is delighted to report…

The Philemon Foundation is delighted to report on the projects completed and undertaken toward our goal of preparing for publication the hitherto unpublished works of C.G. Jung; on the prominent exhibit of Jung’s original Red Book now on display at the 2013 Venice Biennale and on the election of our two new board members, Craig Stephenson and Michael Marsman.

In December, 2012, W.W. Norton published The Red Book: A Reader’s Edition, edited by Sonu Shamdasani and translated by Mark Kyburz, John Peck, and Sonu Shamdasani. Princeton University Press has published The Question of Psychological Types: The Correspondence between C. G. Jung and Hans Schmid: 1915-1916, edited by Ernst Falzeder and John Beebe and translated by Ernst Falzeder with the collaboration of Tony Woolfson.

As you will see from the list of our projects below, the Philemon scholars are well engaged in the translation and editing of our many publishing enterprises in The Philemon Series.

The Philemon Foundation board is pleased to welcome our two new board members: Craig Stephenson from Paris and Michael Marsman from New York.

Craig Stephenson, Ph.D., is a Jungian analyst and psychodrama practitioner. He is a graduate of the C G Jung Institute, Zurich, the Institute for Psychodrama, Zumikon, Switzerland, and the Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex. He is the author of Anteros: A Forgotten Myth (Routledge, 2011) and Possession: Jung’s Comparative Anatomy of the Psyche (Routlege, 2009). He has served on the Executive Committee of AGAP, and is currently editing Jung’s essay on Gérard de Nerval.

Michael Marsman, L.C.S.W., is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in New York City and a graduate of the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association, of which he is now treasurer.  Mr. Marsman received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Social Work degrees from New York University. His research has focused on Hindu mythology. Mr. Marsman was previously a Certified Public Accountant and controller of a $40 million investment bank.

The world wide interest in The Red Book continues. The original Red Book is now on display in the first room of the Venice Biennale’s International Pavilion until November 24th, 2013, where it will be seen by an estimated 500,000 attendees. This follows exhibits in New York, the Library of Congress in Washington, in Los Angeles, Zürich, Paris, and Geneva.

The New York Times June 2, 2013, review of the Biennale included these descriptions:

In a circular darkened room at the entrance to the
pavillion in the Giardini are 40 pages of Carl
Jung’s “Red Book,” an illuminated manuscript
on which he worked from 1914 to 1930.

The review quotes Tobias Meyer, Sotheby’s worldwide director of contemporary art, who called the 2013 show a “game changer.”

“It finally addresses the theory of contemporary art
that is based on Jung, on the unearthing of the
subconscious,” he explained. “The art world right
now is all about Pop and global culture and dispersing
images via the Internet whereas this is about
exploring the deepest sense of oneself and the
genesis of art. It is the antidote to Warhol and Koons.”

Our Philemon board member Caterina Vezzoli describes her visit
to Venice:

Jung’s Red Book is presented at the opening of the
main art pavilion at the Giardini dell’Arsenale in a
special space at the entrance, a beautiful round chapel
with ceiling frescoes. The art exhibition has been given
the name of Palazzo Encyclopedico, “The Encyclopaedic
Palace,” the name of an art work by an unknown visionary
Italian artist living in the United States who created an
amazing architectural structure to contain all the world’s
art works. The original Red Book is protected in a
transparent case at the centre of the space. The
reproductions of its drawings are shown on the wall.
All who attend must go through this space. Everyone
stopped to admire the work, and comment on Jung’s
genius.  The curator’s notes mention Jung’s
transformation process, suggesting the power of the
creative process through art.

Meanwhile, we congratulate Ulrich Hoerni, a grandson of C.G. Jung and Emma Rauschenbauch, on the occasion of his retirement as the Managing Director at the Foundation of the Works of C. G. Jung, while he will remain on its board. Mr. Hoerni has transferred his operational responsibilities to the next generation of the family.  We congratulate Dr. Thomas Fischer as he assumes the role of Managing Director, while Mr. Daniel Niehus continues in his office as President. We look forward to our joint efforts in publishing Jung’s works.

We trust that our donors and the Jungian professional and academic communities recognize the value of our role and will support our mandates. The Foundation needs your assistance to complete the works in progress, and to undertake the editing of more unpublished Jung manuscripts, seminars, and correspondences. As neither the Philemon Foundation nor its scholars receive royalties, received funds are used primarily for scholarly and editorial work. Your support is crucial and much appreciated. In order to widen our donor base, we urge you to enlist your colleagues and friends.

Please review the list below of our published and forthcoming editions, and contribute either to a specific work or to our general enterprise, indicating if you wish to support a particular project.

Donations can be made online at the Philemon Foundation web page at //www.philemonfoundation.org/. If you choose to donate by cheque, please make the cheque payable to the Philemon Foundation and mail it to the Philemon Foundation, c/o Jill Firestone, Controller, 1935 County Line Road, Villanova, PA 19085, USA.

The Foundation receives a small percentage of all purchases made from Amazon through the Philemon link. Please assist us by using this route for all your amazon orders: //www.amazon.com/?tag=wwwphilemonfo-20.

With our thanks and best wishes for the summer.

Judith Harris, President
Caterina Vezzoli, Treasurer
Beverley Zabriskie, Secretary

THE PHILEMON FOUNDATION SERIES

PUBLISHED:

-The Red Book: A Reader’s Edition, edited by Sonu Shamdasani, and translated by Mark Kyburz, John Peck, and Sonu Shamdasani (New York, W. W. Norton, 2012).
-The Red Book. Liber Novus, edited by Sonu Shamdasani, and translated by Mark Kyburz, John Peck, and Sonu Shamdasani (New York, W. W. Norton, 2009).
-Children’s Dreams: Notes from the Seminar Given in 1936-1940, edited by Maria Meyer-Grass and Lorenz Jung, translated by Ernst Falzeder with the collaboration of Tony Woolfson (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2008).
-The Jung-White Letters, edited by Ann Conrad Lammers and Adrian Cunningham, consulting editor, Murray Stein. (London, Routledge, 2006).
-Introduction to Jungian Psychology: Notes of the Seminar on Analytical Psychology in 1925, revised edition edited by Sonu Shamdasani (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2012).
-Jung Contra Freud: Jung’s 1912 New York Lectures on Psychoanalysis, with a new introduction by Sonu Shamdasani (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2012).
-The Question of Psychological Types: The Correspondence between C. G. Jung and Hans Schmid: 1915-1916 edited by John Beebe and Ernst Falzeder, translated by Ernst Falzeder with the collaboration of Tony Woolfson, (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2013).

IN PRESS:

-Jung’s Seminar, Dream Interpretation: Ancient and Modern, edited by Maria Mayer-Grass, Lorenz Jung and John Peck, and translated by Ernst Falzeder with the collaboration of Tony Woolfson (Princeton, Princeton University Press, forthcoming).

NEARING SUBMISSION:

-Jung’s 1931 German Seminar, edited by Ernst Falzeder and translated by Ernst Falzeder with the collaboration of Tony Woolfson.

EDITING COMPLETE (TO BE TRANSLATED):

-Jung’s 1933 Berlin Seminar, edited by Giovanni Sorge, and translated by Mark Kyburz and John Peck.
-Jung’s correspondence with Mircea Eliade, Wilhelm Hauer, and Heinrich Zimmer, edited by Giovanni Sorge.
-Jung’s correspondence with Adolf Keller, edited by Marianne Jehle, translated by Mark Kyburz and John Peck.

IN PROCESS:

-Jung’s 1937-8 Bailey Island and New York Seminars, edited by Suzanne Gieser.
-Jung’s lecture on Gérard de Nerval, edited by Craig Stephenson (Princeton, Princeton University Press, forthcoming).
-Jung’s correspondence with Erich Neumann, edited by Martin Liebscher, and translated by Heather McCartney.
-Jung’s ETH Lectures 1933-1941, eight volumes, edited by Ernst Falzeder and Martin Liebscher, (vols. 1-3 translated by Mark Kyburz and John Peck).
-The Black Books of C.G. Jung (1913-1932).  Edited and Introduced by Sonu Shamdasani. Translated by Mark Kyburz, John Peck and Sonu Shamdasani.

“Philemon and other figures of my fantasies brought home to me the crucial insight that there are things in the psyche which I do not produce, but which produce themselves and have their own life.” – C.G. Jung

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